Gardening Guide to Growing Organic Vegetables, Herbs And Fruit

Soil Analysis

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The ideal garden soil is rich in organic matter, well drained, slightly acid, and replenished with plant nutrients. How good is your soil? The amount of nutrients and the level of acidity can be determined by soil tests.


Types of Soil

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Soils are classified by the size of their particles. Generally, they range from coarse to fine or from light to heavy. Here are some soil types:

Type and characteristics
sandy: Easliy tilled
Sandy loam: Well drained
Loam: Warms quickly Poor nutrient retention
Silty loam: Hard to work
Clay loam: Slow drainage-great moisture retention
Clay: Warms slowly Excellent nutrient retention

The coarser the soil, the earlier it warms in the spring and the earlier it can be worked. Coarse particles of sand retain less moisture than fine particles of clay. Coarse soils require less spring sunshine to reach a temperature suitable for seed germination.

Delay working the soil until it is dry enough so that a compressed ball of soil will break apart when dropped from the height of your hip. Soil that is worked when too moist forms compact clods and makes root growth difficult.

There are five primary types of soil: sand, clay, limestone, peat, and silt. The type of original rock and the mineral fragments’ size determines a soil’s type. It is imperative to have in depth knowledge of your garden’s soil because this knowledge allows you to know exactly what you will be dealing with when gardening because your cultivations, their size, type and planting timing largely depends on the soil’s nature and type.